DEMO Post – Assessment and Questioning

It’s a journey that takes us back to our nation’s founding, when none other than a UCC church inspired the Boston Tea Party and helped bring an Empire to its knees. I have made a solemn pledge that I will sign a universal health care bill into law by the end of my first term as president that will cover every American and cut the cost of a typical family’s premiums by up to $2500 a year. We are the party of Kennedy. And so in that spirit, let me speak as clearly and plainly as I can about some specific issues that I believe we must finally confront together. The second major source of tension that we need to discuss is the situation between Israelis, Palestinians and the Arab world.

More work to do for the workers I met in Galesburg, Ill., who are losing their union jobs at the Maytag plant that’s moving to Mexico, and now are having to compete with their own children for jobs that pay seven bucks an hour. Go into any inner city neighborhood, and folks will tell you that government alone can’t teach our kids to learn – they know that parents have to teach, that children can’t achieve unless we raise their expectations and turn off the television sets and eradicate the slander that says a black youth with a book is acting white. What’s remarkable is not how many failed in the face of discrimination, but rather how many men and women overcame the odds; how many were able to make a way out of no way for those like me who would come after them. And you know what – it’s worked before. You have shown what history teaches us – that at defining moments like this one, the change we need doesn’t come from Washington.

That they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights. Because we all have the capacity to do justice and show mercy; to treat others with dignity and respect; and to rise above what divides us and come together to meet those challenges we can’t meet alone. I am the son of a black man from Kenya and a white woman from Kansas. Our trials and triumphs became at once unique and universal, black and more than black; in chronicling our journey, the stories and songs gave us a means to reclaim memories that we didn’t need to feel shame about…memories that all people might study and cherish – and with which we could start to rebuild.” Segregated schools were, and are, inferior schools; we still haven’t fixed them, fifty years after Brown v. Resistance through violence and killing is wrong and does not succeed.

Posted in DESC Learning - Teachers

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